Apple’s iOS devices and the iTunes Music Store is one of the most talked topic around the web these days, almost more than 250 Million Macs and PCs are currently connected with the global village with installed iTunes in it, and makes it one of the most popular media players installed in the machines. However, it’s not popular among the users whom the most popular software from Apple actually coming with a security flaw that allows Government and Police to spy on the customers of the iTunes.

According to the report, a British company named Gamma International has marketed a piece of the security program to governments and spy agencies called FinFisher, which allows them to track users who have been using the iTunes, all thanks go to the unsolved iTunes security exploit, which actually allow them to spy on you without any indication. The scariest part of the story is not that you are thinking, sadly the exploit was discovered by Apple in the 2008, but they had not take it serious at that time.

Krebs revealed in a blog post:

“A prominent security researcher warned Apple about this dangerous vulnerability in mid-2008, yet the company waited more than 1,200 days to fix the flaw.

“The disclosure raises questions about whether and when Apple knew about the Trojan offering, and its timing in choosing to sew up the security hole in this ubiquitous software title.”

As reported by the security writer, Brain Krebs, the company has not fixed the iTunes exploit until the launch of iTunes 10.5.1 earlier this month with iTunes Match. It seems Apple nearly took 3 years to fix the iTunes exploit, which allowing spy agencies to track their user’s information without any information. Kerbs also pinned his note by saying that Apple only takes around 91 days at an average to fix any security flaw in their program once they are discovered.

However, the security firm which marketed the software to agencies has not commented yet on the matter. Gamma International is famous and specialize in selling computer hacking services to government and nation security agencies.

 

[via The Telegraph]